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I am so grateful you wrote this. I felt the entire time I was reading this, the author had read my journals. I get this too. I am having a homeless adventure right now because my husband "the successful business major" was the only person doing the finances. I know in 2018 I should have been more involved but seriously homeschooling a suicidal autistic child was about all I could successfully handle at the time. Loosing the house was not really his fault- life changed around us and I was unable to home school and earn a living. I can see how a family can be in this position. I am grateful that you did not write a judgmental  piece about her failure as others have. I think we could go so much farther in life lifting each other. I certainly hope your path gets easier and your adventures bring you joy. 

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4 Seasons    0

I loved this book! I felt the writer layed bare her emotions. Sometimes people screw up. And recovering can be very hard. Our society expects perfection and if someone doesnt achieve (or maintain) the culturally approved (behavior, appearance, thought process) then fall from grace can be swift and unforgiving-as evidenced by some of the comments I've read regarding the authors "whining". When in a struggle, whether it is of our own making or not, logic can be difficult to grasp. Think 'emotional shock'.  Hind sight is 20/20 as they say,  and smart people do make mistakes. Moving on with the cards we hold (again-whether we dealt them ourselves or not) requires working through the quagmire of embarassment, disbelief, and self-flaggelation inherent with such life altering events. The author honestly demonstrates this to the reader. Not every book is for every reader, but this book, I believe, will help people who have at some point-past or currently, been humbled by learning that Sometimes life hurts. The author shared one type of choice in how to recover. Life goes on even when we do not think another step can be taken. I see this book as a tool that could give someone newly experiencing a life changing, self made faux pas, some hope. Some courage to change.To know it can be ok. That we didnt know everything when we were riding high in the culturally accepted arena we haughtily judged 'the others' from-before we got smacked in the face by life. Have we not seen some who, unable to adapt (think 1929's financial fall) chose instead to commit suicide? This is an extreme but poignant example. To the judgers: please do not discount the choosers of this book because you havent seen the flip-side of perfection and are still playing it as YOU see it. My personal bent is kudos to the author and her family for being brave enough to share the challenges embarassing or not. One last comment, regarding the memories of grandmother. If you have loved and cared for a significant person in your life, it is sad if they do not run through your mind frequently and at odd moments. Memories long forgotten take on new meaning as we see them through new eyes given by life experiences. Good. Bad. And Ugly. 

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Fino60    0

Me too. Although the author & her husband had an upper middle class lifestyle in the beginning, while my husband & I had barely just pulled ourselves up out the working class where we born into the lower middle class before the housing bubble crash, the majority of what she writes about is my life. Started out having children with an abusive first husband (except I didn't have wealthy parents to help me to escape) to finding a good man that accepted my past, me & my children to both of us working hard to get our part of the elusive 'American Dream' (back when people still thought that was actually possible), to returning to college to get my degree and a career late in life, to getting ensnared with Wells Fargo and suffering a lot of unforeseen medical crisis which resulted in both of us being labeled as walking preexisting conditions and being leveraged out of the healthcare market with premiums higher than our monthly income. I totally get it. This is a mirror of my life and many others like me that belong to the 'sandwich generation.' We were raised to believe that the American Dream was real because it was real for the generation before us and somewhere, somehow, our foundation shifted out from under us. 

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