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Ginny G.

Lots of misinformation

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Ginny G.    7

This book popped up on my library site. I had never seen this before. Thought I would try it. If this is a memoir,I would be Horrified,humiliated and embarrassed. I truly hope a lot of this is just a "story". She sounds like a privileged cry baby blaming everyone except herself. Private schools!? Lots of drinking going on at all points of the book. What's with recipes ?! Who cares. The blame seems to fall in the husband and she is just "clue less". When you have a lot of wants and don't want to pay,well... Bad things happen. How the Hell do you not pay taxes all that time and then get mad!?. She packs up and takes one dog and moved to take care of her needs. Fools around with some guy,goes out with new friends and continually takes no responsibility. Wow. Then as usual,people that have no way to care for themselves get more animals they know nothing  about. I just love the ignorance. Again,they read about caring for redwood creatures by reading from a Storey book. Anyone who is familiar with these little booklets knows they are considered a quick guide for various subjects,not a comprehensive authority. What a couple of complete dummies. She wants to make cheese. Go buy some milk. NOT buying goats for those ridiculous prices from crazy people,but they're pretty nuts,so it fits. I can picture what this place looks like. A falling down dump. I hope the money she's getting from this "book" goes to pay the back taxes. I could care less about the circumstances they got themselves into ,but what about their kids and animals!? I'll just get where they lived in the nice house the neighbors were pissed. I'm sure it was delightful to have them next door. She took the kitchen stools!? Broke into a house that was in foreclosure!? Holy crap!. Then wants forgiveness from the "friends" they did this to? These are the kind of people that I call toxic and avoid like the plague. 

 

 

 

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GregM    3

I made about 50 pages and was already wondering how anyone could see her as anything but a selfish, self centered, bratty whiner. Sounds like her husband was equally to blame. I could get no further in the book. 

 

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I agree. For people who made such bad decisions, it's amazing that they came out OK in the end. There were so many mistakes - and by well-educated people: not communicating with each other, overspending, not filing taxes, drinking all the time, and eating gourmet foods. My husband and I raised 5 kids on one income, simply by choosing to live within our means. It's hard to understand how such smart people could be so foolish.

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MsD    1
29 minutes ago, Genevieve Doyle said:

To err is human....

True, but maturity is learning from your mistakes and being accountable. The author did neither .

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Yes, to err is human.  But this was not an "error".  The behavior described in this book is deliberate irresponsibility.  I read the entire book, looking for the chapter where she and her husband finally start to act responsibly in their spending habits.  Instead I learned that she didn't want to end up like her grandfather in a boring, grinding job that paid the bills, so she takes out another loan to get a graduate degree in yet another field that is unnecessary to real life.  What I want to know is how in the world she qualified for student loans with her financial history?

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LCT    7

I could not finish this book. It was poorly written (simplistic style, elementary thought processes....) and ultimately, it's amazing the combination of the author's incredibly boring, selfish personality with her self-absorption did not somehow cause her to utterly cease to exist. I'm so mad I wasted time on any of this, and so vindicated that (judging from other comments/"spoilers") my assessment of the book (that it sucked) was correct. This book was a terrible choice for publication, much less for something like a "big library read". Sheesh.

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Kitty2    4

I don't agree with her values either (e.g. paying for expensive private school when they are in

desperate financial straits) but I think people are being way too judgmental.  Did you

miss how incredibly hard both of them were working?  There are a lot of Americans right

now being incredibly irresponsible financially and it is helpful to see what their thinking

is, how they get caught up in it.  And why the goats?  I think everyone needs a purpose in

life and making the new place a home and dedicating themselves to something

productive that could be done there makes sense to me. 

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pia    1

 

You really can't judge unless you finish the book.  I felt the same as the above whiners, but it was an easy read and I wanted to finish and see what happened.  I wanted to get to the goats.  The author was a good mother to her kids.. Now she has goat kids.. Her writing style seemed to improve towards the end of the memoir, too.

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garun    0

Hi you guys, I’m not sure I’m qualified to speak my mind here, coming from a different culture. But I look at this book as an introduction on what it is like to be American (outside of Hollywood that is, seen many American movies)

I can see from the comments above that Jennifer is not the American pie I thought she was.

Regards

Guðrún from Iceland

ps I’m visiting New York in june on my quest to understand the American people ;) 

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Rita    0

I’ve taught adults about financial responsibility and you would be amazed how clueless some people are.  However it usually stems from generations who didn’t have the basic skills so never were able to read or knew nothing about bank accounts much less college savings plans, etc. that they could teach their children about. it is rare to see a college graduate much less an accountant, to be this clueless.  Usually a buyer does not need the seller to carry a mortgage unless they have bad credit.  Was the seller also clueless?  

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Momster    4

I didn’t have a sense of this as a pity party or of whining, though there were things about the story I wasn’t pleased with.  If you came away with this impression from the audiobook, the quality of the reader’s voice and inflection didn’t help at all.

This sort of circumstance can happen to anyone.  As I said in another thread, we often let things (like a close eye on the finances) go when we know our partner has a skill we don’t—or are just not as good at.  I’m an old second-wave feminist, but her story of trusting her DH to keep track of the finances and do the taxes, directly paralleled my later-life relationship with my husband. Damn!  I’m the English major!  It’s my understanding there will be no math!  And, I don’t know how much was spent on private school, but I’m not one to judge that, either.  We have several very good and very reasonably-priced private schools in our town—two of which my son went to.  (What are you supposed to do with a kid who reads at 7th grade level, does 5th grade math, and is socially awkward when he’s graduating kindergarten?  Public school?  I think not.). We also have a few priced more along the lines of what I suspect you all are thinking.  Perhaps it was a stretch, but not an unreasonable one for them to afford it.

on the other hand, I feel very judgmental about the booze.  Hard liquor, hard cider, beer, wine, are all—for me—indulgences.  Yes, cool to say your mojito has mint from your garden in it, but beyond that, not an impressive use of limited resources.  Water is amazing.  And generally either free or very low cost.  There are other spending issues I feel judgmental about, especially having—twice in my life—had to forage in the woods for greens to supplement the bag of popping corn or the five or six cans of beans I had to last me the next two weeks.  Oh to have had the kind of money it takes for a single bottle of beer.

And organic yogurt for the chickens, and olive and coconut oil for soap? Sheesh.

I agree, even after “the fall” they never really seemed to understand honest belt-tightening.

Sigh.

 

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