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Moral Compass and Criminal Choices

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JMO    18

I'm not sorry I finished the book, but my take away is still the same thing I felt at the beginning (when I really questioned continuing with all the whining). The idea of a book being put out that is based on the unlawful behavior of choosing to not pay taxes (by an accountant, no less) and having it be sidestepped to show the 'struggle' of that continued choice bothers me (especially since it affects us all). Had there not been blatant disrespect for the officers who were doing their jobs as a result of their unlawful choice, (which also, coincidentally goes to HOW law enforcement is paid=taxes), there might be a feeling of them being sorry for their actions. They didn't, for some reason, have to do jail time for the crime. They may have been embarrassed that they got into this situation, but were they sorry (beyond the self-entitlement)? Even when she said she was, it didn't seem like it was for ethical reasons--or even gratitude for not having logical criminal consequences.

There also wasn't any resolution to the lack of marital communication...which was the basis for the issue in the first place... AND who does this to friends and then blames them, too?! 

I think the author hit on many introspective issues and (beautiful sounding) insights of what we all want in life. But it still represents what is wrong in our society: Oh, it's hard so I'll just fudge things and I'll justify it, blame others and get away with it while living the way I choose to--and then get kudos (and money) for sharing all about what I went through! And THEN people will chalk it up to 'mistakes' and 'being human' while I say the infamous, "I'm sorry."

At what point should people KNOW BETTER? (To really exaggerate the point: Otherwise, it's just a more wholesome version of Kardashian-type behavior). 

Again, this is based on people with finance and education backgrounds (!!!). Doesn't our society and everyone in it deserve better (aka more responsibility) from those who have always had so much more (whether they realized it or not) than most, instead? 

Personally, I wish it were a work of fiction. 

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Phily5    5

The way she talked about her friends who sold them the house really bothered me. Of course they were upset; this was money out of their pocket! I am sure this caused them financial problems too. Why couldn't the author have gone to them, admitted the problem and put the house on the market? That would have better for all then foreclosure.

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Dutchgirl6    1

@Genevieve Doyle, I agree with you. I did read it like a fictional account, because honestly, part of me couldn't wrap my head around the naivety of these two educated, intelligent people. It did help me to accept the situations and circumstances that they put themselves into. I didn't mind the book, but there was a lot of head shaking while reading 

 

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Mary Ann S    0

Genevieve, that's the best way to read autobiographies.  They are works of fiction, describing the events and feelings as the author remembers experiencing them.  All that is shaped by what the author believes about themselves and what he/she wants to project to the world.

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At least they have admitted to their crime.It is up to the American justice system to judge them and to punish them and so far they have not.They will probably be paying them back for the rest of their lives.

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Miss Anette    11

I agree about the blatant disrespect of law enforcement. That caught me off guard and was disappointing, yet once it was mentioned, nothing came of it. The author highlighted their hatred of law enforcement, mentioned a "cold exchange," then bought their goat and left. 

On a similar note, it bothered me a lot when the author stated that she had $4.00 in her bank account (more than once). You haven't saved ANYTHING?? Also, you're buying livestock, feeding them, and housing them to have eggs and make cheese and soap? Our priorities are very different! 

I've learned that I don't like to pity the main character (author) when I read a book. I'd much rather read about a person who finds success and builds a strong marriage. 

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I thought the author was being honest, not whining. She admitted to her willingness to just let her husband handle the finances, even when she sensed something was not right. She said several times that she couldn't believe what they had done either. Do people get so caught up in the day to day of having careers and raising three children that they make really dumb choices? Of course. I found myself being grateful for my own better, but not perfect, life. And let's not forget, this author also faced the horror of domestic abuse and had been beaten down by that. 

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I agree mostly with jmo.  I feel the writer and husband learned nothing about change in their life.  Even though it appears that they did lots of research on goats, they made decisions against all their research and made the poorest choices possible.  It wasn't that they didn't know better.  They chose to go the way that had the easiest outcome of failure and made life much harder for themselves.  Each were selfish and self absorbed without communicating to each other.  What a recipe for marriage.  I was disappointed  with book.  Fiction or not, it was wearing on my mind and continually watching 2 people each fail.

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Patty D    3

People make mistakes, and I was grateful to hear a honest memoir from someone who had made a bigger one than I have. I had just messed up at work and reading about their mistake helped me deal with it more easily. The failure to file taxes was made by David. How did that come about? I imagine that he was so afraid of telling his wife that he was a failure. I think he would have done anything to keep his wife and family together, to keep the hamster wheel going round and round! I know I would never have not filed my taxes, but I very much related to this couple and the stress that modern life puts on us all! 

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CCamp    1

I can understand how the author started out oblivious, ignored the signs, and then really struggled with dealing with what happened.  But as the story progresses, years after coming to realize how badly they messed up their finances, they continue to make poor decisions.  They keep buying more goats so eventually they can have goat cheese.  She talks about having not enough money for food or gas, so they sell a rifle, and use part of that money to buy another goat? Now they have 5... I haven't finished the book yet, but I was getting frsutrated and wanted to see if others felt the same so I'm not worried about spoilers, though I will finish reading.  I just wanted to see them learning to make wiser decisions and working to correct their mistakes, not talking about stealing their friend's stools because they liked them.  

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Herc    0

My feelings are similar. Many memoirs are stories of how the author survives a bad upbringing. This one is about the author making bad decisions and not learning much.  Can't empathize with this one.  Although I did learn much about goats. 

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Mary W    0

I'm about half way through the book and I keep hoping there will be some responsible behavior from them but according to the feedback I've read that doesn't happen.  Disappointing. We all make mistakes but we should learn from the mistakes.  I'll finish the book but my expectations have changed

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