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Adam Sockel

Cabin in the woods

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Adam Sockel    32

Jennifer and her husband moved to a 100-year-old cabin in the woods to save money. Do you think you could live on the homestead the way they did?

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If i were 10 years younger not 65 and healthy, i have sometimes debilitating fibromyalgia, i would totally embrace their life in the cabin. There have been times in my life when i desperately wanted to escape my hectic life and go live in the woods like they are. I could have done so and never looked back if faced with their financial problems. Even now my 2nd husband and i live a simple life in a small town  with our 3 dogs with little debt and few needs. To me this is the life i always wanted. Not the constant stress of my first marriage with high paying demanding jobs, raising children trying to give them what i never had ( even though both my children themselves live simple lives) and constantly trying to pay off debt and then incurring more with a husband that had to have it all. I am now at peace with where i am at and in a way live in a small cabinnin the woods.

 

 

 

 

 

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PaisleyJane    1

This was my dream for many years. I lobbied for a place we could raise goats while my husband campaigned for a computer. Guess who won.

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ejfoofer    3

You had me at waterfall!  I could, especially with a mate as willing, helpful and industrious as David. I found it curious they made no new friendships with any of the people near by who likely would have much "folk wisdom" to share with them. Instead it seemed they acquired all their knowledge via the internet which seems impersonal and an odd approach to Homesteading.

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Posted (edited)

Not in my age (75) anymore.

But in my younger years  I wanted to show and teach my children what it means to live on  farm. I was divorced and had only one income (no alimony or such help)

I purchased a hobby farm. Granted the land was not big,  but we had a horse, a cow, chickens, pigs and ducks. I milked the cow, made butter and cheese. At first it was tough not ever having milked a cow, but with the help from a friend that showed me how and a very patient Jersey cow i learned. I also bred, raised and trained German Shepherds. All the while I was working shift work at the local Police Service. 

The house on the land was unfinished and the kids and i worked hard to finish it, including putting up cupboards, ceilings, doors, a Franklin fireplace. 

I loved it, so did the children. We celebrated each pound of butter from our cow, each pork chop from our pigs and having fresh eggs for breakfast..yum. 

Good memories and I truly can say I know what both David and Jennifer went through. When we took possession of the property there was a calf, half starved in the barn with not a speck of hay or grain in side. The first meal this calf had from us was dog food as I had nothing else. The next morning I went to the neighbourto buy some hay until I could go to the feed store.

As I read this book (not read - almost devoured it) all those Memories came running back through my head.

Thanks Jennifer for your wonderful book. Now I wish I would have had a goat or two to my menagerie.

Trudy

Edited by Trudy Engelen
Small change
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Seams2crazy    8

I live in a dry cabin in AK; came to it from a totally different angle than the author tho. And her “cabin”? In AK that’s a house! 

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I grew up in poverty. Jennifer has no idea how easy she has it. She acts like she's slumming it with a 3 story cabin and only one bathroom. All I can do is shake my head and marvel and how widely perspective can vary. She has two incomes (garnished yes-but two nonetheless). She and her mate are healthy. They have a working automobile. They have items to sell for luxuries like goats. She has family and their emotional support. She has an education and a career. Still, she acts like she is in dire straights because she has less than $5 in her bank account and won't have more money for several days. DAYS. Not weeks, not months. DAYS. So what does she do? She sells an asset to purchase goats. I literally just shook my head and thought, "These people aren't experiencing financial hardship, they're playing at farming. They still have no idea how hard it can get if they aren't careful." I could most definitely homestead in a 100 year old cabin. I've done it before and I'd happily do it again. 

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Seams2crazy    8

Oh and they have water. Running water!! Showers! Indoor flush toilet! A washing machine! Faucets!! I don’t really miss all that-I’m so used to the dry cabin. But it’s all nice to have (especially when it gets cold!)

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Mpw    2

My husband and I did this for a year. We had a baby and a 3 year old. It was both horrible and amazing. We had intended to stay or four years. Oddly, the same recession forced us to leave. We worked for the federal government and they stopped paying us. 

We learned a lot, not the least of which is we could do pretty much anything if we had too, and often it wasn’t as bad as we had imagined it would be. 

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chefteach    5

I believe that I could do this.  Google is a huge help in these days and times, for sure!  I've learned to butcher a chicken by using YouTube.  Through that experience I truly realized I could do anything I put my mind to.

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chefteach    5
On 4/3/2018 at 2:04 PM, ejfoofer said:

You had me at waterfall!  I could, especially with a mate as willing, helpful and industrious as David. I found it curious they made no new friendships with any of the people near by who likely would have much "folk wisdom" to share with them. Instead it seemed they acquired all their knowledge via the internet which seems impersonal and an odd approach to Homesteading.

As a dabbler in farming things, I agree that there is no outreach to their immediate community to help them learn husbandry and care of the animals.  I've met some amazing people by just shopping at Tractor Supply!  I've helped others as well.

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She was basically living my dream, and I found myself rather resentful that she didn't appreciate what she had.  As someone who currently grows as much of her own food as her little lot allows, I was also disappointed that they didn't give the garden a real shot.

Image may contain: plant, tree, outdoor and nature

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MEM1950    1

I think I could, although I would have to learn to live with the smells. I have a very low gag threshold. I would enjoy the challenge of cleaning and and making it livable. Unlike Jennifer, I would have no problem with dispatching the the resident vermin with whatever methods I had available. The exceptions would be the black snakes and the opossum, because they would help to rid the cabin of and barn of mice and unwanted guests.  I would love the outdoor aspect of that life. How sweet the sound of a waterfall would  be to soothe one to sleep.

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maryniasmom    3

I have always said I was born into the wrong time period and that I should have been born 100 years ago, so I think that I could. I know that there would still be adjustments that I would have to make though. I am just starting into this book, so I am not sure exactly what they are going to have to change at this time. Even though I say that I could, I am not sure my family could though!

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Nanette    9
On ‎4‎/‎3‎/‎2018 at 2:04 PM, ejfoofer said:

You had me at waterfall!  I could, especially with a mate as willing, helpful and industrious as David. I found it curious they made no new friendships with any of the people near by who likely would have much "folk wisdom" to share with them. Instead it seemed they acquired all their knowledge via the internet which seems impersonal and an odd approach to Homesteading.

Great observation.

 

 

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Mary C    2
Posted (edited)

Parts I would love! Having money to put into it would be better. And the no running water would definitely be something I could not accept, but ... sounds beautiful and I could live simply. 

 Of course, there is a difference between wanting to live somewhere and having to live somewhere..

Edited by Mary C
Added info
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Rogo86    0

I fantasize about purchasing an inexpensive acreage and starting a little homestead all of the time 😍

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Momster    4
Posted (edited)

Yes and no.  I’ve lived a version of this twice in my life, and still hope to do it again.  Both places I lived, I had no electricity and non-potable water.  Both places were heated with wood, and both were shared with a variety of critters from mice to wood rats to civet cats.  I had gardens at both and I had three hens at one.  Both had “squatty-potty” outhouses.

The thing you don’t realize until you have lived this life, is how much time you have.  That seems completely contrary, but when you don’t waste hour after hour with a screen in front of you, you have masses of time to wander and explore, take in the beauty and appreciate the calm.  I did have a radio at both places so I had music and NPR.  Every Saturday I chopped and brought in the week’s wood.  One evening a week, after work in town, I hit the laundromat and shopped for the week.  If I hadn’t had an outhouse, I wouldn’t have gone outside at night and gotten an eyeful of the Hale-Bopp comet.

In winter, it was a joy to heat a canner full of water on the wood stove and bathe in a Rubbermaid container out on the porch under the brilliant night sky, and in the summer to shower under the sun with water heated in the hose.

I desperately miss that simplicity.  I wouldn’t miss the internet, cable, phone service, or email.  Yes, I currently have them, and yes, I could drop them without having an existential crisis.

The “cabin” Ms McGaha and her husband live in is pretty much “uptown Saturday night” to me.  I confess I’d never live where she does—I’ve done that, too.  Briefly.  It was long enough to cure me and send me packing back to the PNW.  Heat and humidity, ticks, chiggers, copperheads, brown recluse spiders—egad!  I’m glad there are people who love those places.

Homesteading, though.... no.  It’s hard work.  When you have a partner, that helps.  And when you have children to share the burdens, that helps more.

Edited by Momster

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sws    1

I'm  68, so no I don't think I could embrace the lifestyle  now.  In my younger days?  Maybe, if I  had to.  The cabin  was so rustic, and I  don't like mice and snakes!!  I would love to see the cabin.

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This place seems like a dream come true for me. Waterfalls, places to walk with the puppies. The house might be dilapidated, but there is a hint of promise in the worn out places with the addition of some ingenuity. The only thing that would give me pause is that big copperhead in the house. Otherwise, sign me up.

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