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Tee

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About Tee

  1. Appreciate your story. Wish the book were more similar. Thing is, it IS taking about criminal actions. They didn't pay taxes an accountant didn't pay taxes. She didn't notice she wasn't signing forms every tax season. There are specific laws that cover inherent doses because I'd precisely this type of rationalizing and delineate unawareness. Again: criminal. They didn't just live at their means, they lived beyond their means. They had no savings or safety net beyond criminal acts and using the officers of that criminality to get a fresh start. Knowing what many have been through, who lived within their means, but lost jobs and whose houses lost value, it's hard to feel sympathy for prime for people so entitled. We all want the best, esp for or kids (ha!). But we settle because it's responsible adult behavior. Sucks to be a grown up.
  2. I tried this book because I thought it'd discuss a family's negotiation of the recession. I came through fairly intact but I know many people who had to declare bankruptcy, experienced foreclosures, etc. Anyone want to discuss those things? I cancelled cable ten years before it became popular to do so, have used Magic Jack for the same ten years, and don't go out to movies or concerts or restaurants. I didn't send my kids to private school. My "extra" cash goes into savings and I know I'm lucky to have any extra. I shopped at thrift stores when I didn't need to, so I haven't been devastated by the necessity now. Still, I lost things, and it still hurts, but I paid my taxes and managed household finances. Must be others...
  3. OMG! The WHINING!

    I couldn't become interested, either. As she describes her life, she expected to be able to have the best, always, and she truly believed being a homemaker/soccer mom was equal to being a breadwinner. She never mentions an act of charity or giving. Everything is focused on what she thought she needed to feel safe and successful -- with no apparent awareness that those things usually originate from within, not from private school, your SUV, multiple pets, or the husband whose problems you are too self centered to notice. Then, it all falls down and she contrives to form a business that is tax avoidant. Not good with numbers? Huh? As for choice for the Big Read, all I can imagine is the "Great Recession" seemed like a subject readers could relate to, and discuss. However, never had her advantages, nor her convenient back up holler home. Just can't bring myself to read on, hoping for a moment of self awareness. Raw material for it doesn't seem to exist. Actually reminded me of an acquaintance, in 2010, who was similarly occupied (homemaker in a wealthy area) very vocally stressing over the possible amount of her husband's upcoming brokerage firm bonus. Six figure bonus. In front of people who worked three jobs and were being evicted. How about a book for the rest of us? all all 5 h, the whining..All I can think is that this book was chosen because most of us were impacted in some way by the "Great Recession" and this a book on this topic would be one a lot of people could empathize with and discuss.
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